A description of a computer virus as an illegal and potentially damaging computer program designed t

Timeline of notable computer viruses and worms Early academic work on self-replicating programs[ edit ] The first academic work on the theory of self-replicating computer programs [18] was done in by John von Neumann who gave lectures at the University of Illinois about the "Theory and Organization of Complicated Automata ". The work of von Neumann was later published as the "Theory of self-reproducing automata". In his essay von Neumann described how a computer program could be designed to reproduce itself. The Reaper program was created to delete Creeper.

A description of a computer virus as an illegal and potentially damaging computer program designed t

The story focused on an interview with an ex-hacker named Kevin Mitnick. Like many hackers, Mitnick would spend up to six hours a day in front of a computer trying to break into supposedly foolproof systems, "unconcerned by the potential consequences".

Mitnick learned the hard way. Computer crime can and does have grave legal implications. Although Mitnick claims he hacked with "ethics" - that he never stole, caused damage or profited from his practices- not all hackers adhere to these principles.

And as computers become more and more common, so are incidents of hacking and other computer-related crimes. Computer crime, also known as cybercrime, includes such activities as hacking, virus creation and distribution, forgery, theft and denial of access.

Computes have essentially unlocked the gates to a new era in lawbreaking. Due to technological advances, crimes are committed today that could not have existed a decade ago and the traditional crimes are being made easier. By its very nature, the cyber environment is border-less, affords easy anonymity and methods of concealment to bad actors, and provides new tools to engage in criminal activity".

The unique nature of computer crime has caused a debate among law enforcement experts.

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Some believe that cybercrime is just a conventional crime committed with high-tech devices. Others argue, however, that cybercrime is a totally new phenomenon that, in order to be dealt with effectively, requires new law enforcement techniques and new legislation.

This statute, which is codified at 18 U. The Act prohibited the following behavior: To knowingly access a computer without authorization, or in excess of authorization, in order to obtain classified United States defense or foreign relations information with the intent to harm the United States or benefit a foreign nation.

To obtain information, via unauthorized access, from the financial records of a financial institution or from any protected computer if the conduct involves interstate or foreign communication.

To access a computer to use, destroy, modify, or disclose information found in a "federal interest" computer system, as well as to prevent authorized use of any computer used for government business if the usage interferes with government activities. To knowingly and with the intent to defraud participate in the trafficking of passwords or similar information through which computers can be accessed without authorization.

The history of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act illustrates the complexity of cybercrime legislation.

Morris was charged with releasing a "worm" that, according to Morris, unintentionally caused harm to many government and university computers.

The legal language applied in the case was to someone who: The District Court in the Morris case interpreted the law as only requiring the intent to access a computer, not the intent to cause actual damage, and thus Morris was convicted.

As a result of this and other gaps in the legislation, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act has since been amended.

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The most notable amendments occurred in October of with the enactment of the National Information Infrastructure Protection Act. Listed below are some of the changes made to the legal code: The intentional accessing of a protected computer that recklessly causes damage has been added as an offense.

This applies to people like Robert Morris who intentionally let a virus loose, though not necessarily with malicious intent. The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act has become a landmark in the fight against cybercrime. The Act provided a single piece of code that specifically addressed computer-related offenses, thus eliminating the need to rely on legislation written for other crimes which often proved inadequate when applied to computer activity.

For example, the statute pertains to interstate transportation of stolen property, 18 U. The existence of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act also means that when new computer technology is introduced, instead of having to scan through the entire United States Code amending every statute potentially affected, law makers can focus on essential amendments to only this legislation.

The legislation most applicable to computer viruses is just general cybercrime legislation. In the United States, the distribution of a virus that affects computers used by government or by financial institutions is a federal crime under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

In addition to the Morris computer worm case, there have been other successes. In December ofDavid L.What does a computer virus do? They are designed to infect your programs and files, alter the way your computer operates or stop it from working altogether.

even the most damaging and devious strains. they just can't offer the computer virus help you need to keep up with the continuous onslaught of new strains. Previously undetected. Designed to replicate relentlessly, computer viruses infect your programs and files, alter the way your computer operates or stop it from working altogether.

In , the botnet virus Gameover ZueS was discovered to use peer-to-peer downloading sites to distribute ransomware and commit banking fraud. Viruses. A computer virus is a type of malware that propagates by inserting a copy of itself into and becoming part of another program.

A description of a computer virus as an illegal and potentially damaging computer program designed t

It spreads from one computer to another, leaving infections as it travels. Viruses can range in severity from causing mildly annoying effects to damaging data or software and causing denial-of-service (DoS) conditions.

A computer virus is a potentially damaging computer program that affects, or infects, a computer negatively by altering the way the computer works without the use’s knowledge or permission. %(1). A(n) _____ is a potentially damaging computer program that affects, or infects, a computer negatively by altering the way the computer works without the user's knowledge or permission.

virus A ____ operating system is a complete operating system that works on a desktop computer, a notebook computer, or mobile computing device.

An illegal and potentially damaging computer program designed to infect other software by attaching itself to the software with which it comes in contact. Effects of a Computer Virus How do you notice you have a computer virus?

Computer operation becomes sluggish. Programs take longer to load.

A description of a computer virus as an illegal and potentially damaging computer program designed t
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