A discussion on the issue of criminal justice not being systematic

Download image Children of incarcerated fathers suffer from worse physical health: They are a quarter to a third more likely than children of nonincarcerated fathers to suffer from migraines, asthma, and high cholesterol. Children of incarcerated fathers are 51 percent more likely to suffer from anxiety, 43 percent more likely to suffer from depression, and 72 percent more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. For example, a pound, 5-foot 6-inch, year-old woman has a predicted greater weight of 9 pounds if, when she was a child, her parent was incarcerated.

A discussion on the issue of criminal justice not being systematic

Well, first of all, Bill, thanks for moderating this. Thank you to the Marshall Project. But I do think there are certain principles that my administration -- our esteemed Attorney General Loretta Lynch and her deputy and others -- are pursuing.

And so when I came into office, and we saw a huge variance in how crack cocaine was being treated versus powder cocaine, people immediately asked the question, why is that -- particularly given that there might be differences in demographics in terms of who uses it, and that would be an example of an area where we had to reform it.

So, one is fairness. I think one of the things that has come up again and again in the discussions of reform is, in any criminal justice system we want to make sure that the punishment fits the crime. Number three is a recognition that incarceration is just one tool in how we think about reducing crime and violence and making our communities safe.

Connected to that is where are we spending our money? So those are the kinds of areas where I think there is actually rough agreement.

Those are all legitimate debates. I was in West Virginia yesterday, talking about the opioid epidemic. They move on to heroin. And there was a consensus we need to spend more of our time on treatment and not just on incarceration as a strategy.

And I pointed out to them that part of what makes this an area where maybe those of us who are better off or middle class are more sympathetic is because it seems more like our kids are vulnerable, as well. So, with that, I should probably make sure that the Chief actually gets a word in.

A few decades ago, when crime rates were higher and when the only way to get elected to office was to be tougher on crime than your opponent, Congress began restricting the license the judges had in making their sentences.

They established mandatory minimum sentences for a number of crimes. They tightened up the safety valve. And that seems to now be recognized as the pendulum having swung too far in one direction.

The bill that passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee today does some modest reductions in mandatory minimums. And -- sorry, having a senior moment on my thought -- but prosecutors love mandatory minimums, as a rule. So this is really a question for you, John. Prosecutors love mandatory minimums because they can use them as leverage to drive plea bargains, because they can use them to turn low-level offenders and get them to rat out their bosses.

How far can you go in eliminating or reducing mandatory minimums, do you think? Why not just eliminate them altogether? Well, let me first start out by thanking the President and also the Attorney General for their incredible leadership in this area.

Racial Disparities in the Criminal Justice System Joan Petersilia June peatedly addressed the possibility of racial discrimination in the criminal justice system, but it remains an open question. Because the study deals with a complex and sensitive issue, the report describes the data, methodology, and findings in considerable. Chapter 3 67Racial Discrimination in the Criminal Justice System issue of immigration, and Mexicans in particular are constructed as an illegal immigrant group (De Uriarte in Alvarez 88). The International Criminal Court (ICC or ICCt) is an intergovernmental organization and international tribunal that sits in The Hague in the monstermanfilm.com ICC has the jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for the international crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war monstermanfilm.com ICC is intended to complement existing national judicial systems and it may therefore only exercise its.

Part of the reason we have a moment where all of law enforcement and the entire political spectrum are supporting changes to the sentencing regime is the leadership that you have shown and the people in this room have shown, including Chief Beck. Mandatory minimums are an important part of how the federal system is set up, but sincewhen the Smart on Crime policy was announced by then-Attorney General Holder, federal prosecutors have been instructed not to use mandatory minimums except in cases that really merit their attention -- in other words, aggravated felons; leaders of drug organizations; violent people.

But so far, we have not seen a corresponding drop in the willingness of lower-level conspirators to cooperate with us. So the bottom line is -- you ask the question, should we eliminate mandatory minimums entirely, and I think the answer to that is no.

But we have to reserve their use for the most severe, dangerous and violent offenders who are out there. Why not eliminate them, though? Why not just have sentencing guidelines the way we have now and have had it in the past, and leave it to the discretion of judges?

Well, I certainly think that -- part of what prosecutors do is advocate to judges. But using them very sparingly for less serious offenders also makes sense.

Chief, do you want to pick up on that? Well, just very briefly, if you view the criminal justice system as a response to a sickness in America, if you view it through the medical aspect, then you have to look at sentencing as a dosage.

And I think that we are now experiencing a time in the United States where crime is at a level where we require a different dosage. And we have to recognize that all crimes do not carry the same weight. And some crimes involve addiction and mental illness and have other pathways that can be more effective than incarceration.

And in states across the nation, some of our prisons and jails are schools for criminality.struggle to create islands of civility amid threats to public order posed by low-level criminal behavior that eludes traditional measures.

Appropriately, public policymakers and administrators in the criminal justice system are responding to the issue of crime in all its complexity. I’ve read the long comments here meant for a college student, very well written and covered the subject well.

I could write pages and pages on the subject of “social justice” but why bore you. Racial Disparities in the Criminal Justice System Joan Petersilia June peatedly addressed the possibility of racial discrimination in the criminal justice system, but it remains an open question.

Because the study deals with a complex and sensitive issue, the report describes the data, methodology, and findings in considerable. [Content note: hostility toward social justice, discussion of various prejudices] “Words!

A discussion on the issue of criminal justice not being systematic

Words! Words! I’m so sick of words! I get words all day through. Conceptions of race within the criminal justice system have always been a controversial issue. Indeed, there is no denying that in terms of. Not to be outdone, Senator Hillary Clinton promptly denounced the “disgrace of a criminal-justice system that incarcerates so many more African-Americans proportionately than whites.” If a listener didn’t know anything about crime, such charges of disparate treatment might seem plausible.

Paul Plante: On Social Justice in America Today – CAPE CHARLES MIRROR