A tale of revenge in the cask of the amontillado

Introduction The desire for revenge has always been a strong motive for the action of man. Battles have been fought and wars were waged because of one reason:

A tale of revenge in the cask of the amontillado

Plot summary[ edit ] Fortunato and Montresor drink in the catacombs. Montresor lures Fortunato into a private wine-tasting excursion by telling him he has obtained a pipe about gallons, [1] litres of what he believes to be a rare vintage of Amontillado.

Montresor knows Fortunato will not be able to resist demonstrating his discerning palate for wine and will insist that he taste the amontillado rather than Luchesi who, as he claims, "cannot tell Amontillado from Sherry".

Montresor warns Fortunato, who has a bad cough, of the dampness, and suggests they go back, but Fortunato insists on continuing, claiming that he "shall not die of a cough".

During their walk, Montresor mentions his family coat of arms: At one point, Fortunato makes an elaborate, grotesque gesture with an upraised wine bottle.

When Montresor appears not to recognize the gesture, Fortunato asks, "You are not of the masons? When they come to a nicheMontresor tells his victim that the Amontillado is within.

Fortunato enters drunk and unsuspecting and therefore, does not resist as Montresor quickly chains him to the wall. Montresor reveals brick and mortar, previously hidden among the bones nearby, and proceeds to wall up the niche using his trowel, entombing his friend alive.

At first, Fortunato, who sobers up faster than Montresor anticipated, shakes the chains, trying to escape. Fortunato then screams for help, but Montresor mocks his cries, knowing nobody can hear them. Fortunato laughs weakly and tries to pretend that he is the subject of a joke and that people will be waiting for him including the Lady Fortunato.

Before placing the last stone, he drops a burning torch through the gap.

The Cask of Amontillado - Wikipedia

He claims that he feels sick at heart, but dismisses this reaction as an effect of the dampness of the catacombs. Publication history[ edit ] Montresor walling up Fortunato. Without a detective in the story, it is up to the reader to solve the mystery.

Many commentators conclude that, lacking significant reason, Montresor must be insanethough even this is questionable because of the intricate details of the plot.

It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong".

A tale of revenge in the cask of the amontillado

After Fortunato is chained to the wall and nearly entombed alive, Montresor merely mocks and mimics him, rather than disclosing to Fortunato the reasons behind his exacting revenge.

Montresor may not have been entirely certain of the exact nature of the insults for which he expected Fortunato to atone. His house had once been noble and respected, but has fallen slightly in status. Montresor even imparts this blame to Fortunato when he states, "You are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are happy, as once I was".

This interchanging of fortunes is a suggestion that, since the names Montresor and Fortunato mirror one another, there is a psychological reciprocal identification between victim and executioner. It is with this converging of the two characters that one is able to see the larger symbolism of the Montresor crest — the foot steps on the serpent while the serpent forever has his fangs embedded in the heel.

Moffitt Cecil of Texas Christian University argues that his actions in the story make that assumption questionable. For example, Fortunato comments on another nobleman being unable to distinguish amontillado from sherry when amontillado is in fact a type of sherry, and treats De Grave, an expensive French wine, with very little regard by drinking it in a single gulp.

Cecil also states that a true wine connoisseur would never sample wine while intoxicated and describes Fortunato as merely an alcoholic. Cecil also suggests that some people might feel Fortunato deserved to be buried alive for wasting a bottle of fine wine.

Inspiration[ edit ] An apocryphal legend holds that the inspiration for "The Cask of Amontillado" came from a story Poe had heard at Castle Island South BostonMassachusettswhen he was a private stationed at Fort Independence in Massie had been killed in a sword duel on Christmas Day by Lieutenant Gustavus Drane, following a dispute during a card game.

Poe and English had several confrontations, usually revolving around literary caricatures of one another. Its plot was convoluted and difficult to follow, but made references to secret societies and ultimately had a main theme of revenge. This parody of Poe was depicted as a drunkard, liar, and an abusive lover.Told in the first person by an Italian aristocrat, “The Cask of Amontillado” engages the reader by making him or her a confidant to Montresor’s macabre tale of revenge.

The Revenge of the Cask of Amontillado Essay examples - The revenge of the Cask of Amontillado Set in an unspecified Italian city and an unidentified year, the Cask of Amontillado is a short story that majorly revolves on revenge.

The tale of the cask of Amontillado contains several aspects of the theme revenge.

At a Glance

The strongest viewpoint is without any doubt the personal involvement of the author. His dispute with English and Fuller is the reason for the origin of this monstermanfilm.com: 7. The Cask of Amontillado Introduction Edgar Allan Poe, an American short-story writer, essayist, and poet, published “ The Cask of Amontillado ” in It was his last, and some say greatest, short story.

Essay on Revenge in The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe Words | 3 Pages.

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deception and revenge is what makes up his reputation. The short story under analysis is a part of his latter works; “The Cask of Amontillado”, a story of revenge takes readers into the mind of the murderer.

Revenge in The Cask of Amontillado Essay - Revenge in The Cask of Amontillado Revenge is the deliberate act of inflicting injury in return for injury. Revenge also is the ghost that haunts one man's soul for almost fifty years in Edgar Allen Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado." Is vengeance really satisfied by Montersor in Poe's tale.

The Cask of Amontillado