The use of cocaine and its negative effects

Cocaine was introduced to Americans in and quickly grew in popularity as people grew more and more entranced by its effects on the mind and body. Cocaine is a stimulant, meaning it causes the user to experience heightened alertness and a euphoric sensation, along with arousal and sense of confidence.

The use of cocaine and its negative effects

View The 3-Step Process Using an illegal drug like cocaine can have numerous potential hazards and cause a host of negative side effects.

The use of cocaine and its negative effects

Cocaine is a stimulant drug that decreases the urge to sleep and eat, and it acts on the pleasure centers in the brain. When taking cocaine, individuals may feel euphoric and energized. Cocaine is considered to be highly addictive. Use of cocaine carries risks for anyone, but the risks are amplified when it is abused by pregnant women.

Risks and Dangers Pregnant women who abuse cocaine may be prone to skin infections, anemia, and malnutrition. After the baby is born, women who battle cocaine addiction may be more likely to suffer from more severe postpartum depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideations, as these are possible side effects of cocaine withdrawal already.

Incidents of violence, self-harm, and involvement in hazardous situations, resulting in infant danger or neglect, may result in the removal of the child from the home after birth.

Short- & Long-Term Side Effects of Cocaine - Brain Damage - Drug-Free World

Legal troubles may occur for the mother when there is evidence of cocaine abuse or addiction. Cocaine passes through the placenta to the fetus and can create numerous issues for the unborn baby. Using cocaine early in pregnancy may increase the risks for a miscarriage, while continued use can cause preterm labor, placental abruption, and low birth weight.

Infants may be born small for their gestational age, the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology reports. Unborn babies may be at risk for heart defects, cardiovascular issues, and disruption of their autonomic and central nervous systems, the journal Therapeutic Advances in Cardiovascular Disease reports.

The long-term side effects of fetal exposure to cocaine on the heart and cardiovascular system are relatively unknown at this point. Defects to the genitals, brain, internal organs, and kidneys may also be side effects on the developing fetus due to cocaine use by a pregnant woman.

Other possible side effects of cocaine abuse on an unborn baby or newborn, as published by GLOWMinclude: Sudden infant death syndrome SIDS: Fetal death Babies born to mothers who are dependent on cocaine may also be born dependent on the drug and suffer from withdrawal after birth.

Cocaine withdrawal in a newborn may result in sleeplessnessdifficulties feeding, irritability, tremors, muscle spasms, and uncontrollable crying.

Last updated on May 23, TPregnant women who abuse cocaine may be prone to skin infections, anemia, and malnutrition. After the baby is born, women who battle cocaine addiction may be more likely to suffer from more severe postpartum depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideations, as these are possible side effects of cocaine withdrawal already.

Perhaps even more unfortunate, however, are the negative effects of cocaine on society. The effects of cocaine on society can be seen in the user’s families, communities, and workplaces. Domestic violence and random acts of violence are often fueled by cocaine or crack cocaine use.

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Jul 23,  · Even though a user becomes tolerant to cocaine, they may not become sensitized to its anesthetic and convulsant effect, which may explain some cocaine deaths. Overdose can cause seizures, heart failure, and arrest breathing. Withdrawal can include exhaustion, sleepiness or sleeplessness, hunger, irritability, depression.

Crack Cocaine Addiction. Compared to other addictive drugs, crack cocaine exists as one of the most addictive substances on the market. A drug’s addictive potential corresponds with the degree of damage it causes in the brain in terms of altering brain chemical functions.

Cocaine raises the risk of serious heart problems and even of sudden death in people who use it because of its range of cardiovascular effects, which include sharp increases in heart rate and narrowing (constriction) of blood vessels.

Each method of cocaine use poses its own risks. When short-term use crosses the line into long-term use, the risks increase for new and exaggerated negative results.

These lasting health risks illustrate the drastic impact cocaine has .

Crack Cocaine Addiction