Xenia in ancient greece

There are many possible reasons why hospitality was more prevalent in those times. The less advanced methods of transportation used in Homeric times, such as by boat or by foot, were much slower than modern forms of transportation.

Xenia in ancient greece

Xenia in ancient greece

Do those words all seem very different to you? For all you know, they might be dangerous. They might have come to kill you or steal from you. But at the same time, civilization needs people to travel — traders, scientists, ambassadors, messengers. So we have to conquer our fear and behave in a friendly way towards strangers anyway.

We give them food and a place to sleep. In return, guests are supposed to behave themselves too: Odysseus and his men put out the eye of the Cyclops, Polyphemos ca. The most famous story was about Helen of Troy: But there are many other Greek stories about xenia.

When Odysseus was away fighting the Trojan War, other men came and lived in his house, uninvited, and tried to force his wife Penelope to marry one of them.

But Odysseus came home and killed them all. See also the story of the Cyclops and Circe, who were terrible hosts. As time went on, Greek city-states started to make official xenia agreements with specific people or families from other city-states, to make it safer and easier for traders and ambassadors to travel.

These were like visa agreements in modern countries.

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Other places had similar arrangements: The Bible stories of Lot and Rebecca at the well emphasize hospitality, and so does the Roman story of Baucis and Philemonand so do the Anansi stories from Africa.

Invite somebody over and treat them well.Ancient Greece. a custom of hospitality, specifically the giving of presents to guests or strangers, especially foreign ambassadors.

— xenial, adj.

Xenia is the ancient Greek concept of hospitality, the generosity and courtesy shown to those who are far from home and/or associates of the person bestowing guest-friendship. Xenia was considered to be particularly important in ancient times when people thought gods mingled among them. If one had poorly played host to a stranger, there was the risk of incurring the wrath of a god disguised as the stranger. Xenia (Greek: ξενία, translit. xenía, meaning "guest-friendship") is the ancient Greek concept of hospitality, the generosity and courtesy shown to those who are far from home and/or associates of the person bestowing guest-friendship.

See also: Foreigners. Xenia – The Odyssey The concept of guest hospitality is extremely important in ancient Greece. Hospitality, or Xenia, is so essential in Greek society that Zeus, in addition to being the king of the Gods, is also the God of travelers.

Xenia - guests and hosts in ancient Greece | monstermanfilm.com Study Guides

One of the most important themes in The Odyssey is the concept of xenia, which is the old Greek word for hospitality. In modern times, hospitality is something we rarely think of, and the first thing that comes to mind is the hotel industry, but in ancient Greece, xenia was not about hotels, or just about etiquette, it was a way of life with many benefits in a world that was still mostly savage.

Odysseus and Athena. One of the most important themes in The Odyssey is the concept of xenia, which is the old Greek word for hospitality. In modern times, hospitality is something we rarely think of, and the first thing that comes to mind is the hotel industry, but in ancient Greece, xenia was not about hotels, or just about etiquette, it was a way of life with many benefits in a world that.

Talk:Xenia (Greek) Jump to navigation Jump to search (Ritualised friendship in ancient Greece) or (Guest-friendship in ancient Greece)? The former is the heading used in the Oxford Classical Dictionary. Flounderer , 5 December (UTC) They should certainly be merged.

Xenia in ancient greece

However, I'm against a long title in brakets, possibly just Xenia. Xenia is the ancient Greek concept of hospitality, the generosity and courtesy shown to those who are far from home and/or associates of the person bestowing guest-friendship.

Xenia in Ancient Greece - Sample Essays